Posted by: debrakolkka | March 23, 2011

A house for sale in the mountains

A friend of mine is looking for a house to buy in the mountains, so on a damp Sunday we set out to investigate an old farmhouse we had heard was for sale. The day became more damp the higher we went into the mountains and just as we arrived at the site, it began to snow lightly.

the owners showing us the house

part of the old farmhouse

the key to the door

I’m not going to show you inside, because it was just awful. I can’t imagine that anyone would be much interested, especially since it turned out that only a couple of rooms were for sale. The rest of the house belongs to someone else.

The day wasn’t a total loss. The area was beautiful with the snow falling gently around us. We even saw a herd of deer scampering through the trees.

a great setting

snowdrops pushing through

I have no idea what this plant is

the flowers

When they told us the asking price for 2 rooms in a decrepit farmhouse, I was reminded of the Australian movie The Castle.  “Tell’em they’re dreamin” was my response.

As we drove off the snow got heavier and when  we climbed higher into the mountains we were surrounded by a winter wonderland – not a wasted afternoon at all.

 

snow on the trees

a snow topped shrine


Responses

  1. Good grief. Who sells two rooms out of a house in the middle of country? Lovely photos though Deb, glad the day wasn’t a complete write-off (although a story like that one is a goodie..) 🙂

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  2. Your one-word response to Celia speaks for itself. Good to know the drive wasn’t wasted. Those snowdrops and snow on the shrine and on the trees are beautiful! Always exciting to find something around the corner….

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    • I was a fun afternoon and the snow was gorgeous.

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  3. Oy vai! Renovaters delight!

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  4. Fantastic photos Deb !!! What camera do you use ??
    Anything goes with the Italians.

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    • I have a Canon G11 and I love it. I just point and shoot, I know nothing about photography.

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  5. I love the keys photo, stunning pic, worth the trip for that photo IMO!

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    • I love the key picture too – all sorts of possibilites – but not in this case.

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  6. How strange – selling 2 rooms in a house!! Now that takes things to a whole new level huh. Beautiful photos though, sounds & looked like a great adventure 🙂

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  7. I do like your pics. The one of the keys is great and the section of the house and the snowdrops.

    Selling just two rooms in a farmhouse sounds a bit weird. Is is common there?

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    • I have just noticed you answered about selling just part of the house… 😉

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    • Thank you for your comments. We would think it strange in Australia to buy only a part of a house, but it is quiet common here.

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  8. It is a Helleborus! Commonly called Christmas Rose.

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    • I seen the single hellebore – they grow like mad under the trees in Bagni di Lucca – but I have never seen one as complicated as this. Thanks for the tip.

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  9. The plant looks like a variety of Euphorbia. I agree with Celia-selling 2 rooms in a house in the country, seems quite rediculous!

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    • Didn’t see your post about the plant until after I posted mine. Helleborus it is!

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      • It isa strange looking hellbore, isn’t it? You would have to bonkers to buy those 2 rooms.

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  10. How strange they sold only 2 rooms. Well, it is rather usual here to buy a part of a house and not the whole of it, but when it happens it’s because the owner has divided the house in two or more smaller apartments. Many people choose to turn a large house into smaller apartments. They usually do it for two reason: either to create a less expensive apartment to give to children (so they can live together though not exactly in the same house) or when they want to sell these apartments: houses are becoming expensive in Italy so it’s easier to sell a small 2 or 3-room flat than a large house. The seller can make more money and the buyer can spend less. I don’t know if I’m clear… I suppose this is what happened to your friend, though it’s really weird…
    Apart from that, it’s my dream to but an old farm-house to restore and renovate!!!! They’re so fascinating… 🙂

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    • I understand that it is usual here to divide houses into apartments. In fact my apartment is one floor of what would have been a 3 story house originally. I have seen lots of divided houses, but this one was just silly and I don’t believe it will ever sell in the state that it is. It was a fun afternoon anyway. We are rebuilding a stone house in the mountains right now. I went yesterday to check the progress and it is moving along well.

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      • I’d love to know more about your stone house! I guess I’ll have to patiently wait for a post 🙂

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      • I am putting a post together right now. Work has started and the first bricks (the inside shell) have been laid. I’ll go up again in a few days when hopefully we will be to the first level and I will have something to show you. Let’s hope the weather stays fine.

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  11. Ahh, the smell of the crisp air, a little light snow… your photos transport me and I love it.

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    • I wish I had been quick enough to photograph the deer.

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  12. I am feeling very jealous right now!

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    • You will be here soon enough.

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      • Can’t wait to see your piece of heaven. Very excited to see a pictorial of the progress on your stone house in the mountains 🙂

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      • There are already 2 posts up on the pile of rocks, as we call it. The first is called Grand designs – a pile of rocks in Tuscany and the second is called Work starts on the pile of rocks. Instalment 3 should be up next week.

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      • Actually there are 3 – I forgot one. The second is called an Update on the pile of rocks and the third is called Work starts. Next week will be number 4.

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  13. I can’t find these 😦 Where do I look?

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    • If you type the names in “search” they should come up.

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  14. I too was puzzled by the two rooms for sale – but now I have it – they were the teenagers bedrooms right? You did say they were awful. What a fabulous idea. I actually once mailed a notice to my youngest daughter, purporting to come from the World Health Organisation, notifying of an inspection by the WHO the following week! I didn’t think of advertising it for sale, can’t think why. I love the photos, especially the door and key, what stories it could tell, even the old nails. Anywhere with snow would be paradise at the moment, it was 30 degrees here last night at 6.30.

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    • Trust you to come up with the perfect explanation.

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  15. Haha Italians! Isn’t that funny and yes the words from The Castle come immediately to mind 😀

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  16. I think Jan is onto something there, maybe it was a student house? We have those in Bristol in abundance, rooms divided into three or four, flimsy partitions, scary child-adults who block drains and set fire to pans and lock themselves out regularly, get blind drunk etc etc. The future doctors and surgeons, lawyers and accountants… I used to live in the student quartier and I was really too old to be there I guess.

    A beautiful post, I love the stories you tell and those snowdrops all meltwater and drippy, not to mention the jailer’s medieval key pictures. Yes, keep them coming 😀

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    • Thank you. I love those snowdrops with frozen rain on them. I will be sorry when they have all gone.

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  17. I am thinking about a thriller movie, trapped in an old house where no body, no neighbor around, LOL, honestly I am afraid of such an isolated house, it just will take time to get help if something bad happen… :mrgreen:

    I like the key’s photo, it is just so ancient, yet dramatic… 😀 I will like this post!

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    • Thank you, the house is a bit isolated for me too.

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  18. 😦 I couldn’t find the “like” button… LOL

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