Posted by: Debra Kolkka | January 6, 2018

Tree Top Walk

The Tree Top Walk was built to allow people to enjoy the incredible beauty of the tingle forest in the Valley of the Giants in south west Western Australia without damaging the fragile trees. Years ago people used to drive through a single old tingle tree until the tree was destroyed. It died in 1990. The trees have shallow roots so the sky high platform was built to prevent damage on the forest floor.

The walk was begun in 1995 and was opened in 1996. It consists of six 60 metre lightweight bridge spans on seven pylons. Its highest point is 40 metres above the bottom of the valley.

Much of the plant life in the tingle forest is unique to the area. Some of the plants have origins that can be traced back 65 million years when the continent was joined to what is now Africa, India, Antarctica and South America. The region has an annual rainfall of between 1000 to 1200mm, well drained gravelly soil, low nutrient content, hilly terrain and minor seasonal change. The canopy includes the red tingle, yellow tingle, marri and karri.

Come for a walk.

Tree Top Walk

The spans sway slightly as you walk, an interesting sensation. The floor of the walk is see through.

Tree Top Walk

There are signs along the way to explain the story of the tingle forest and its inhabitants.

From the bridge the tops of the trees are on eye level and you can look down (if you have no fear of heights) to the forest floor.

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Beside the Tree Top Walk is the Ancient Empire, a ground level experience of the tingle forest. Bitumen paths lead visitors around the trees to minimise damage.

The red tingle is the star of the show at the Valley of the Giants. It is the largest buttressing eucalypt and can have a base circumference of up to 20 metres. They have a shallow root system that spreads as they grow older, causing the trees to buttress. This gives them more stability and also allows them to absorb more nutrients from the shallow soil.

A distinctive feature is its large, hollowed out base. The hollows have been created over a long time by fire, fungal and insect attack.

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

Tree Top Walk

The texture of the back is fascinating.

Meet Grandma Tingle.

Tree Top Walk

Grandma Tingle was so named because of her gnarled and wrinkled appearance and her distinct ‘face’ which gives her an almost human character. In the past she was called the Gatekeeper as though she was keeping watch over the forest.

The matriarch of the forest measures over 12 metres in circumference, 34 metres in height and she is estimated to be over 400 years old.

The Tree Top Walk is a must do in Western Australia. The walk through the tree tops is excellent, but if you have a fear of heights the Ancient Empire Walk will allow you to get up close and personal with these gorgeous giants.

http://www.exploreparks.dbca.wa.gov.au

 

 

 


Responses

  1. The walk really is worth doing if you are visiting the south of WA. The giant tingles are so majestic.

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    • Thank you for taking us there! It is fabulous.

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  2. What an interesting walk! It is a great idea to have created this structure to protect those precious trees and their environment.

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    • It is an excellent way to walk among the trees.

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  3. What a great experience

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  4. Beautiful! If you havent seen “My Passion for Trees” with Judi Dench, I think you may love it. She spends a year exploring the magical and secret lives of trees. It was on BBC2 tv and is currently available on YouTube. I will never look at a tree the same again!

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    • I saw a reference to that recently. I will look for it, thank you.

      Like

  5. I walked among the karri trees back in ’14, another adventurous experience in WA – Western Australia. One of the most exciting trips I’ve taken. Thanks for letting me relive the experience Debra!

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    • It is a fabulous area. We loved our tree walk.

      Like


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