Posted by: Debra Kolkka | February 8, 2019

Beautiful

I have just been to the Easton Pearson Archive at the Museum of Brisbane at City Hall in Brisbane. Lydia Pearson and Pam Easton are the world renowned fashion design duo who hail from Brisbane.

I have known the designers since almost the beginning and have followed their careers all the way. I have several pieces that I have bought over the years. I was always delighted to find their designs in fabulous shops on my world travels, Bergdorf Goodman in New York, Browns in London, Biffi in Milan and once in a wonderful boutique in Viareggio.

Come for a walk through the collection.

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

 

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Easton Pearson

Pam Easton and Lydia Pearson began their partnership in 1989. Their careers in fashion started in different areas. Lydia’s skills were in pattern making, garment construction and running a workshop. Pamela was skilled in commercial operation, creating ranges and establishing a brand. They managed all aspects of the label together.

Their first shop was established in 1992 beside their Brisbane workshop. They attended Paris Fashion Week every year from 1999. By 2011 their garments were stocked in 140 stores in 24 countries.

Easton Pearson designs are known for the artisanal techniques they employed…intricate embroidery, beading, hand painting and fabric manipulation. One of their overseas workshops was based in Mumbai and worked exclusively for Easton Pearson. It employed 300 workers over the duo’s career.

They maintained transparency in their supply chain and ensured the well being and fair pay of artisans. They were at the forefront of what is now known as “slow fashion”.

Easton Pearson closed in 2016 but their garments are treasured by anyone lucky enough to own them.

The Easton Pearson Archive continues at the Museum of Brisbane until 22nd April 2019.

Open 10.00am – 5.00pm Monday to Thursday and 10.00am – 7.00pm Friday.

Admission $12

http://www.museumofbrisbane.com.au


Responses

  1. Beautifully photographed Debra.

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  2. I think the Oncologist Paul Eliadis donated the collection to the Museum having purchased it

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    • You are correct. What a wonderful thing to do.

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      • Indeed –

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  3. Is it not magnificent? So many beautiful clothes and such inspiration!

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    • It is fabulous. I was happy to see a skirt I have in the exhibition.

      Liked by 1 person

      • How wonderful! Beautiful pieces to have and wear.

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  4. They had such fun with their fabrics and designs – fabulous.

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  5. Gorgeous outfits. I could see myself in the green sequin top and striped skirt. 😍

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  6. I wouldn’t look good in any of these.

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  7. These pieces are amazingly unique, thank you for sharing with us Debra.

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  8. I saw this exhibition when in Brisbane a few weekends ago and loved it: the embroidered and beaded work particularly. Worth a visit!

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    • It is a stunning exhibition. It has been very popular I think.

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  9. That white ensemble with black lace or embroidery appliqué is exquisite

    Like

  10. wonderful design of cloth

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  11. What beautiful work, these pieces make me want to dress in a more unique way!

    Like


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